FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

Teenage Students Raising Hands
 

 

What is coaching?

 

In essence, coaching is:

·    Helping clients change in the way they wish and helping them go in the direction they want to go

·    Supporting clients at every level in becoming who they want to be

·    Evoking self-awareness in clients will help empower them to propose their solutions or strategies that could lead to their desired change

 

Coaching is a partnership between coach and client. A coaching session will typically occur as a conversation between these two parties, and it focuses on helping the client discover answers for themselves. This focus is vital because people are more likely to engage with solutions they generate themselves rather than those forced upon them. The coach, therefore, need not be an expert in their clients’ field of work.

The role of coaching is to create the conditions for learning and growing. A coach acts as a catalyst to facilitate the clients’ progress towards defined goals using skilled listening and questioning techniques. The aim is to help clients achieve their personal best by producing the results they want in their personal and professional lives. 

 

What is a coaching model?

A Coaching Model is a method designed to guide an individual through a process from where they are currently to where they want to be. The purpose of a coaching model is to create a framework for guiding another person through the following steps: establishing a desired goal, understanding where they are, exploring options for where they are headed, determining what may be obstacles and establishing a plan of action. 

 
 

What is an evidence-based approach to coaching?

Coaches utilise an evidence-based approach using scientific research based on their observations and experiences, drawing upon their knowledge of the behavioural sciences, psychology, and coaching best practices. As such, they can gather evidence and offer clients more effective and accurate assessments, along with positive results. Evidence-based coaching is rooted in proven science, and professionals with the proper education, training and certifications stand apart from those using unproven coaching approaches. 

 

How is coaching different to therapy, mentoring, consulting and training?

Coaching vs Therapy

Therapy generally focuses on the past and ‘why’ certain behavioural patterns occur while coaching work on ‘how’ to achieve a goal. The process of coaching takes the client’s current starting point as an acceptable neutral ground and is more action-based from that point onward.

Coaching vs Mentoring

Mentors work with individuals as advisers and subject matter (or industry) experts. In contrast, coaches provide clients with guidance on navigating certain situations and anticipating and tackling challenges without providing any advice or counselling.

Coaching vs Consulting

Consultants tap into their specific expertise to assume that they will diagnose problems and define their clients' solutions. A coach taps into the client’s capabilities to generate his/her own solutions and find answers he seeks within himself/herself. Coaches provide confidential, supportive and discovery-based approaches and frameworks.

Coaching vs Training

Both coaching and training entail learning as an integral part of the process. In a coaching engagement, however, the client is the expert, and therefore expectations and objectives are set by the client. In contrast, in a training session, the trainer or the instructor set objectives of training programs. Moreover, training involves a structured and linear path to learning, while coaching takes a more informal approach as the coach address topics put forward by the client. 

 

Who is qualified to be a coach?

Because coaching is an industry and not a profession, there is no shared, standard body of knowledge, regulation, entry barriers, and apparent authority regarding who can coach. However, most professionals find it ethically essential to obtain training and experience as they move into a new field. Becoming certified in coaching tends to increase professionals' skills, confidence, credibility, and marketability. Though several membership organisations provide coaching certifications, two of the most recognised and credible coaching bodies are ICF (International Coaching Federation) and ISCP (International Society of Coaching Psychology).

 
What are the different types of coaches?

 

There are many types of professional coaching specialities.  A coach might operate with a specific focus or lens, depending on the client, the need and the context.  Here are some of the most common types of coaching:

Life Coaching 
Audience: Individuals of any type, age, or profession
Focus: Creating a more fulfilled life; Identifying values, purpose, goals and dreams; Recognizing barriers; Taking action towards goal achievement. 

Career Coaching

Audience: Working individuals of any type, or those seeking employment

Focus: Identifying individual strengths, passions & interests; Career vision and goals; Finding fulfilment and purpose through work; Clarifying the best "fit" between a person and a career or organizational culture; Accelerating one's career path.

Business Coaching
Audience: Entrepreneurs and business owners
Focus: Business growth and success; Identifying goals for the future while improving current operations.

Executive Coaching
Audience: Business executives or senior leaders
Focus: Improving leadership abilities; Managing organizational change; Finding work/life balance; People and performance management. 

Leadership Coaching
Audience: Individuals of any type who want to improve or gain leadership skills
Focus: Exploring the definition and nature of leadership; Identifying leadership strengths and areas of improvement; Emotional intelligence or "soft skills"; Defining a future vision for oneself as a leader; Taking action towards leadership goals.

 

Internal Coaching
Audience: Employees who are being coached by someone who works at their organization
Focus: Improving effectiveness and performance as an employee; Conflict management; Communication; Identifying employee strengths and opportunities for development. 

Source: https://icfhoustoncoaches.org/Types_of_Coaching/ 

 
What are the different types of coaches?

 

There are many types of professional coaching specialities.  A coach might operate with a specific focus, or lens, depending on the client, the need and the context.  Here are some of the most common types of coaching:

Life Coaching 
Audience: Individuals of any type, age, or profession
Focus: Creating a more fulfilled life; Identifying values, purpose, goals and dreams; Recognizing barriers; Taking action towards goal achievement. 

Career Coaching

Audience: Working individuals of any type, or those seeking employment

Focus: Identifying individual strengths, passions & interests; Career vision and goals; Finding fulfilment and purpose through work; Clarifying the best "fit" between a person and a career or organizational culture; Accelerating one's career path.

Business Coaching
Audience: Entrepreneurs and business owners
Focus: Business growth and success; Identifying goals for the future while improving current operations.

Executive Coaching
Audience: Business executives or senior leaders
Focus: Improving leadership abilities; Managing organizational change; Finding work/life balance; People and performance management. 

Leadership Coaching
Audience: Individuals of any type who want to improve or gain leadership skills
Focus: Exploring the definition and nature of leadership; Identifying leadership strengths and areas of improvement; Emotional intelligence or "soft skills"; Defining a future vision for oneself as a leader; Taking action towards leadership goals.

 

Internal Coaching
Audience: Employees who are being coached by someone who works at their organization
Focus: Improving effectiveness and performance as an employee; Conflict management; Communication; Identifying employee strengths and opportunities for development. 

Source: https://icfhoustoncoaches.org/Types_of_Coaching/